Often asked: Do You Have To Pull Over For A Funeral Procession In Indiana?

Sec. 6. A person who drives a vehicle may pass a funeral procession on the procession’s left side on a multiple lane highway if the passing can be done safely.

Is it illegal to not pull over for a funeral procession?

There is no legal requirement for you to stop for a funeral procession. However, if the lead car has passed a red light, all other cars may follow, in which case you’ll have to stop. However, traditionally, it shows respect to pull over for passing funeral processions.

Do funeral processions have the right of way in Indiana?

— Indiana state law requires drivers to give the right of way to a funeral procession.

What is the protocol for a funeral procession?

In most states, the lead vehicle of a funeral procession must observe all traffic lights and signs. Once it goes through an intersection legally, the rest of the funeral procession can follow without stopping. If you’re in a processional, don’t stop at traffic lights or stop signs unless there’s an emergency.

Do you have to pull over for a funeral procession in California?

ARKANSAS: There are no state laws governing funeral processions. CALIFORNIA: The only law California has regarding funeral processions prohibits anyone from disregarding any traffic signal or direction given by a peace officer in uniform authorized to escort a procession.

Do you have to pull over for a funeral procession in Michigan?

Right of way and funerals It is a civil infraction to cut through a funeral procession. Drivers should be appropriately respectful of funeral processions but they are not required to pull over should they see a funeral procession on the road.

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Is it illegal to not stop for a funeral procession in Indiana?

All vehicles in a procession may, but don’t have to, have funeral pennants, flags, or windshield stickers; Indiana Code 9-21-13-6: “A person who drives a vehicle may pass a funeral procession on the procession’s left side on a multiple lane highway if the passing can be done safely.”

Should you pass a funeral procession?

And, of course, drivers should always pull over for a funeral procession. Not only is it polite to let a grieving family make their way from the funeral home to the burial site, but in many states, it’s the law. In fact, in many states, police officers can ticket drivers who cut through a funeral procession.

Do you have to pull over for a funeral procession in Tennessee?

According to the Tennessee Code, funeral processions that are properly identified shall have the right of way on any street, highway or road. But there is no law requiring a driver to stop for an oncoming procession.

Which of the following rules apply to all drivers not involved in an organized funeral procession?

The following rules apply to all drivers not involved in an organized funeral procession. Do not enter an intersection in which a procession is going through a red signal light, unless you may do so without crossing the path of the funeral procession.

When a funeral procession is present ____ has the right-of-way?

Motorists, pedestrians, and bicyclists must yield the right-of-way to funeral processions. When the lead vehicle enters an intersection, the remaining vehicles in the funeral procession may follow through the intersection, regardless of any traffic control devices.

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Who leads funeral procession?

The officiant (and the choir, if there is one) leads the procession in for religious services, while the celebrant or funeral director usually leads secular (non-religious) processions. The coffin follows, with honorary pallbearers in front of it if there are any. The chief mourners walk behind the coffin.

Why do cops lead funeral procession?

Local Politicians, Activists and/or Celebrities – When there is a funeral for a local, well-known person, police will sometimes offer an escort in order to keep any press at bay as well as to handle any problems with crowds or the public.