Question: Who Said It What My Dear Lady Disdain Are You Yet Living?

Quote by William Shakespeare: “What, my dear Lady Disdain! are you yet living?”

What my dear Lady Disdain are you yet living?

Benedick: nobody marks you. What, my dear Lady Disdain! are you yet living? such meet food to feed it as Signior Benedick? in her presence.

Who is dear Lady Disdain?

“my dear Lady Disdain” – the contrast between ‘my dear’, a loving term, and ‘Lady Disdain’ highlights Benedick’s conflicting feelings for Beatrice.

What does Benedick mean when he calls Beatrice Lady Disdain?

Benedick greets her with a nickname that means scornful. ” What, my dear Lady Disdain! Are you yet living? ” ( Act 1 Scene 1) The sarcasm implied by this nickname and the question that Benedick offers both show how their relationship is based on their quick-witted arguments.

Who says but it is certain I am loved of all ladies only you excepted and I would I could find in my heart that I had not a hard heart for truly?

As Benedick says to Beatrice, “[I]t is certain I am loved of all ladies, only you excepted. And I would I could find it in my heart that I had not a hard heart, for truly I love none” (I.i.101–104).

Who said Lady Disdain much ado about nothing?

In Act I, Scene I of Much Ado About Nothing, Benedick refers to Beatrice as ”Lady Disdain.

Who says never came trouble to my house in the likeness of your grace?’?

His welcome to Don Pedro is so convoluted that the feeling and meaning can be lost: ‘Never came trouble to my house in the likeness of your grace: for trouble being gone, comfort should remain: but when you depart from me, sorrow abides, and happiness takes his leave’ (I. 1.73–5).

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Is Claudio thine enemy?

Is Claudio thine enemy? Is Claudio your enemy? would eat his heart in the marketplace. Hasn’t he proven himself to be a great villain—slandering, scorning, and dishonoring my cousin?

Who refuses to marry at the beginning of the play?

Claudio refused to marry Hero because he thought that she was cheating on him. Claudio was tricked, by Don John, into thinking that Hero was cheating on him with another man.

What does give not this rotten orange to your friend mean?

Claudio rejects Hero at the altar by calling her a ‘rotten orange’. The phrase creates an image of something that should be fresh and delightful as ruined. The effect on the audience is that they feel sympathy for Hero, who they know to be far from ‘rotten’.

How many hath he killed and eaten in these wars?

43 how many hath he killed and eaten in these wars? 45 to eat all of his killing. 46 Faith, niece, you tax Signior Benedick too much; 46.

What does I had rather hear my dog bark at a crow than a man swear he loves me?

Beatrice’s Thoughts about Love I had rather hear my dog bark at a crow than a man swear he loves me. ” The preference for dogs barking over words of love is hyperbole that emphasizes Beatrice’s negative opinion about love and marriage at this point in the story.

Who said I had rather hear my dog bark at a crow than a man swear he loves me?

William Shakespeare Quote: “I had rather hear my dog bark at a crow, than a man swear he loves me.”

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What metaphor do both Ursula and Claudio use to describe fooling Benedick and Beatrice?

” Ursula compares tricking Beatrice into thinking Benedick loves her to catching a fish in an example of a metaphor. Another example of a metaphor is when Claudio compares Hero to a rotten orange because he thinks she cheated on him.

What kind of person does Beatrice seem to be?

Beatrice is “ a pleasant-spirited lady” with a very sharp tongue. She is generous and loving, but, like Benedick, continually mocks other people with elaborately tooled jokes and puns. She wages a war of wits against Benedick and often wins the battles.

For which lady does Claudio declare his love?

Claudio declares his love for Hero to Benedick. He is in love at first sight, showing that he is romantic and, it might be argued, superficial. After eavesdropping on his friends in the orchard, Benedick decides he loves Beatrice.